Methyldopa 125mg tablets

Main information

  • Trade name:
  • Methyldopa 125mg tablets
  • Dosage:
  • 125mg
  • Pharmaceutical form:
  • Tablet
  • Administration route:
  • Oral
  • Class:
  • No Controlled Drug Status
  • Prescription type:
  • Valid as a prescribable product
  • Medicine domain:
  • Humans
  • Medicine type:
  • Allopathic drug

Documents

Localization

  • Available in:
  • Methyldopa 125mg tablets
    United Kingdom
  • Language:
  • English

Therapeutic information

  • Product summary:
  • BNF: 02050200

Status

  • Source:
  • eMC
  • Last update:
  • 30-01-2019

Patient Information leaflet: composition, indications, side effects, dosage, interactions, adverse reactions, pregnancy, lactation

450mm

Read all of this leaflet carefully before

you start taking this medicine because it

contains important information for you.

Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it

again.

If you have any further questions, ask

your doctor or pharmacist.

This medicine has been prescribed for you

only. Do not pass it on to others. It may

harm them, even if their signs of illness are

the same as yours.

If you get any side effects talk to your

doctor or pharmacist. This includes any

possible side effects not listed in this

leaflet. See section 4.

What is in this leaflet

1. What Methyldopa Tablets are and what

they are used for

2. What you need to know before you take

Methyldopa Tablets

3. How to take Methyldopa Tablets

4. Possible side effects

5. How to store Methyldopa Tablets

6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What Methyldopa Tablets are

and what they are used for

The name of your medicine is Methyldopa

125 mg, 250 mg or 500 mg Tablets (referred to

as Methyldopa Tablets throughout this leaflet).

Methyldopa Tablets contain the active

ingredient methyldopa, which belongs to a

group of medicines called antihypertensives,

which lower blood pressure.

Methyldopa Tablets are used for the treatment

of hypertension (high blood pressure).

2. What you need to know before

you take Methyldopa Tablets

Do not take this medicine

if you are allergic to methyldopa or any of

the other ingredients of this medicine

(listed in section 6)

if you have ever had liver disease

if you have ever had depression

if you have been taking a type of medicine

called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor

(MAOI)

if you have high blood pressure due to a

tumour near your kidney called

'phaeochromocytoma' or 'paraganglioma'

If you have porphyria (a rare, inherited

blood disorder).

If you are unsure if any of the above apply to

you, please talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Warnings and precautions

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking

Methyldopa Tablets

if you have a blood disorder called

haemolytic anaemia

if you have liver problems

If you have jaundice (yellowing of the skin

and eyes)

if you have a fever

If you have abnormal movements

(involuntary).

Check with your doctor while taking this

medicine if you are going to have:

dialysis

an operation

a blood transfusion.

Other medicines and Methyldopa Tablets

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking,

have recently taken or might take any other

medicines, including any medicines obtained

without a prescription, as some medicines may

affect each other’s action. This includes herbal

medicines.

Do not take Methyldopa Tablets if you are

taking a type of medicine called a ‘monoamine

oxidase inhibitor’ (MAO inhibitor) used to treat

depression.

It is especially important to talk to your doctor

or pharmacist if you are taking any of the

following:

alprostadil used to treat erectile

dysfunction

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory

drugs) which are used to relieve pain

medicines used to treat anxiety or

insomnia (e.g. diazepam, temazepam)

antihypertensive medicines such as

beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers

or diuretics (also known as `water tablets')

used to treat high blood pressure (e.g.

propranolol, nifedipine, verapamil or

furosemide)

corticosteroids (e.g. prednisolone,

hydrocortisone)

medicines to treat Parkinson's disease

such as levodopa or entacapone

moxisylyte, used to treat Raynaud's

syndrome

muscle relaxants such as baclofen,

tizanidine

nitrates (e.g. glycerol trinitrate “GTN”,

isosorbide dinitrate/mononitrate)

combined oral contraceptive (“the pill”) or

hormone replacement therapy (HRT)

lithium - used to treat some types of

depression

medicines called 'phenothiazines' such as

chlorpromazine

used for mental illness

and sometimes feeling and being sick

medicines called 'tricyclic antidepressants'

used to treat depression

sympathomimetics medicines used mainly

for coughs and colds (e.g. ephedrine or

salbutamol)

iron and supplements containing iron,

such as multivitamins with minerals.

If you are not sure if any of the above applies

to you, talk to your doctor or pharmacist

before taking Methyldopa Tablets.

Surgery

If you have to have surgery, including dental,

that requires an anaesthetic, you must inform

the dentist or hospital that you are taking

Methyldopa Tablets.

Methyldopa Tablets with alcohol

You are advised not to drink alcohol while

taking Methyldopa Tablets. Discuss this with

your doctor if you have any questions.

Laboratory tests

Your doctor may do blood tests to check how

your liver is working during the first 6 – 12

weeks. He or she may use similar tests if you

have a fever at any time while you are taking

methyldopa.

Tell your doctor that you are taking

methyldopa if you are having a blood or urine

test, as this medicine may affect the results of

certain laboratory tests.

Rarely, in patients taking methyldopa, urine

may darken when it is exposed to air after

voiding.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

If you are pregnant or breast-feeding,

think you may be pregnant or are

planning to have a baby, ask your

doctor or pharmacist for advice

before taking this medicine.

Driving and using machines

You may feel drowsy or light-headed

while taking Methyldopa Tablets.

If this happens do not drive or use

any tools or machines.

3. How to take Methyldopa Tablets

Always take this medicine exactly as your

doctor or pharmacist has told you. Check with

your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.

You should take this medicine by mouth and

exactly as advised by your doctor or

pharmacist. The amount you take each day

will depend on your condition. It is important to

continue taking Methyldopa Tablets for as long

as your doctor has prescribed. Do not take

more or less than your doctor has prescribed.

The breakline is not intended for breaking

the tablet.

Recommended dose

Adults

The usual starting dose for the first two

days is 250 mg two or three times a day

Your doctor may then change your dose

depending on how you respond

You should not take more than 3000 mg in

a day.

The elderly

The usual starting dose will not be more

than 250 mg each day

Your doctor may then slowly increase the

dose

You should not usually take more than

2000 mg in a day.

Children

The doctor will work out the number of tablets.

The dose is based on the weight of the child.

The usual starting dose is 10 mg for each

kg of body weight each day

This dose is taken in two to four doses

during the day

Your doctor may then change the dose

depending on how the child responds

A child will not usually take more than

65 mg for each kg (or 3000 mg a day),

whichever is less.

If you take more Methyldopa Tablets than

you should

If you realise that you have taken more

Methyldopa Tablets than your doctor has

recommended (or if someone else has taken

some of your Methyldopa Tablets), contact

your doctor right away. If you cannot contact

your doctor, go to your nearest hospital

casualty department and take the pack with

you.

If you forget to take Methyldopa Tablets

If you forget to take a dose, just take the next

dose at the usual time. Do not take a double

dose to make up for a forgotten dose.

If you stop taking Methyldopa Tablets

Do not stop taking Methyldopa Tablets without

talking to your doctor.

If you have any further questions on the use

of this medicine, ask your doctor or

pharmacist.

4. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, this medicine can cause

unwanted side effects, although not

everybody gets them.

Contact your doctor IMMEDIATELY if you

have any of the following side effects as they

are serious and require medical attention:

an allergic reaction – symptoms such as

shortness of breath, skin rash or itching,

hives, swelling of your lips, face or

tongue, chills or

fever or painful joints

chest pain, slow heart rate, existing

angina made worse, problems with the

electrical current in the heart (AV block)

severe skin reactions (such as painful

reddening, followed by blistering and

peeling of layers of skin)

liver problems, including jaundice and

hepatitis - signs include yellowing of your

skin and eyes, sometimes with a fever,

pale stools and dark urine

pain in the gut and diarrhoea caused by

inflammation of the bowel (colitis)

severe pain in the gut and back caused by

inflammation of the pancreas

(pancreatitis)

reduction in red blood cells (anaemia) –

this can make your skin pale and make

you weak or breathless

abnormal blood test causing symptoms

such as pale skin, tiredness, fever and

sore throat

having movements you cannot control

The following reactions have also been

reported:

Blood:

bruising and prolonged

bleeding after injury

your medicine may alter the

numbers and types of your

blood cells and cause a

rise in urea in the blood

Nervous system:

feeling sleepy or tired - this

may happen at the start of

treatment or when the dose

is increased, and usually

goes away

headache or feeling weak – this may

happen at the start of treatment and

usually goes away

pins and needles

Bells' Palsy (weakness or paralysis of the

muscles on one side of the face)

Parkinsonism – with symptoms such as

tremor, a decrease in body movements

with an inability to move your muscles

confusion

frequent dizziness or fainting

dizziness due to low blood pressure and

light-headedness (particularly when

standing up quickly)

Nose and chest:

nasal stuffiness

Stomach and gut:

feeling sick

being sick

abdominal pain

feeling bloated

constipation

excess wind

diarrhoea

dry mouth

sore or black tongue

Skin and hair:

skin rash or peeling skin

Joints and muscles:

painful and/or swollen joints

muscle pains

Infections:

swelling of salivary glands

General:

water retention causing swelling and

weight gain

fever

Sexual:

breast enlargement

breast development in men

loss of periods in women

abnormal production of milk

changes in sexual function such as

impotence and not being able to ejaculate

decreased sex drive

Psychiatric:

mental changes, including nightmares or

depression

delusions and paranoia - which will stop

when you stop taking this medicine

Laboratory tests:

Your doctor may need to carry out simple

blood tests during the first few months of

therapy with methyldopa. Results could

show:

o a decrease in blood cell production

o an increase in some white blood cells

o abnormal levels of prolactin

Methyldopa Tablets may also interfere with the

interpretation of certain blood and urine tests.

Reporting of side effects

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor

or pharmacist. This includes any possible side

effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also

report side effects directly via the Yellow Card

Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard

By reporting side effects, you can help provide

more information on the safety of this

medicine.

5. How to store Methyldopa

Tablets

Keep this medicine out of the sight and reach

of children.

Do not store above 25°C.

Container (125 mg): Keep the container tightly

closed and store in the original container.

Blister pack (250 mg and 500 mg): Store in the

original package.

Do not use this medicine after the expiry date

that is stated on the carton, label or blister after

EXP. The expiry date refers to the last day of

that month.

Do not throw away any medicines via waste-

water or household waste. Ask your pharmacist

how to throw away medicines you no longer

use. These measures will help protect the

environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other

information

What Methyldopa Tablets contain

Each film-coated tablet contains 125 mg,

250 mg or 500 mg of the active ingredient

methyldopa (anhydrous).

The other ingredients are anhydrous citric acid,

povidone, sodium starch glycollate, stearic

acid, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline

cellulose, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose,

Opaspray Yellow M-1F-6047B solids (which

includes titanium dioxide (E171), yellow iron

oxide (E172) and Quinoline yellow (E104)).

What Methyldopa Tablets look like and

contents of the pack

Methyldopa 125 mg Tablets are yellow, round,

film coated tablets, embossed with “MT/125”

separated by a breakline.

Methyldopa 250 mg Tablets are yellow, round,

film coated tablets, embossed with “MT/250”

separated by a breakline.

Methyldopa 500 mg Tablets are yellow, round,

film coated tablets, embossed with “MT/500”

separated by a breakline.

Methyldopa 125 mg Tablets are packed in

containers of 56 tablets.

Methyldopa 250 mg Tablets and Methyldopa

500 mg Tablets are available as blister packs

of 56 tablets.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and

Manufacturer:

Marketing Authorisation Holder

Sovereign Medical, Sovereign House

Miles Gray Road, Basildon, Essex

SS14 3FR, UK

Manufacturer

Waymade Plc, Sovereign House

Miles Gray Road, Basildon, Essex

SS14 3FR, UK

This leaflet was last revised in July 2017

PL 06464/1432

Methyldopa 125 mg Tablets

PL 06464/1433

Methyldopa 250 mg Tablets

PL 06464/1434

Methyldopa 500 mg Tablets

To request a copy of this

leaflet in Braille, large print or

audio format, contact the

licence holder at the above

address or telephone:

01268 535200 (select option

Medical Information) / e-mail:

info@waymade.co.uk

Package leaflet: Information for the user

Methyldopa

125 mg, 250 mg & 500 mg Tablets

GB 724-9816-APIL

PL 06464/1432/3/4

Name: Methyldopa 125, 250, 500 mg tablets

Special instructions:

Barcode scan check:

Size: 160 x 450 mm

Scale: 1 to1

Colours

Job No:

C/Date:

Update:

Black

000000

GB 724-9816-APIL

24.04.17

25.04.17

27.04.17 26.06.17

27.06.17

Fonts used:

Arial 9pt.

Origination:

2017 v15 IHJS

CD xx

CC 2017

MAC/PC

Note:

CD X6

Type: A

03:10

© 2017

Barcode:

Miles Gray Road,

Basildon, Essex.

SS14 3FR

Laetus:

PAGE 1 of 2

Ver: 08

Read all of this leaflet carefully before

you start taking this medicine because it

contains important information for you.

Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it

again.

If you have any further questions, ask

your doctor or pharmacist.

This medicine has been prescribed for you

only. Do not pass it on to others. It may

harm them, even if their signs of illness are

the same as yours.

If you get any side effects talk to your

doctor or pharmacist. This includes any

possible side effects not listed in this

leaflet. See section 4.

What is in this leaflet

1. What Methyldopa Tablets are and what

they are used for

2. What you need to know before you take

Methyldopa Tablets

3. How to take Methyldopa Tablets

4. Possible side effects

5. How to store Methyldopa Tablets

6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What Methyldopa Tablets are

and what they are used for

The name of your medicine is Methyldopa

125 mg, 250 mg or 500 mg Tablets (referred to

as Methyldopa Tablets throughout this leaflet).

Methyldopa Tablets contain the active

ingredient methyldopa, which belongs to a

group of medicines called antihypertensives,

which lower blood pressure.

Methyldopa Tablets are used for the treatment

of hypertension (high blood pressure).

2. What you need to know before

you take Methyldopa Tablets

Do not take this medicine

if you are allergic to methyldopa or any of

the other ingredients of this medicine

(listed in section 6)

if you have ever had liver disease

if you have ever had depression

if you have been taking a type of medicine

called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor

(MAOI)

if you have high blood pressure due to a

tumour near your kidney called

'phaeochromocytoma' or 'paraganglioma'

If you have porphyria (a rare, inherited

blood disorder).

If you are unsure if any of the above apply to

you, please talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Warnings and precautions

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking

Methyldopa Tablets

if you have a blood disorder called

haemolytic anaemia

if you have liver problems

If you have jaundice (yellowing of the skin

and eyes)

if you have a fever

If you have abnormal movements

(involuntary).

Check with your doctor while taking this

medicine if you are going to have:

dialysis

an operation

a blood transfusion.

Other medicines and Methyldopa Tablets

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking,

have recently taken or might take any other

medicines, including any medicines obtained

without a prescription, as some medicines may

affect each other’s action. This includes herbal

medicines.

Do not take Methyldopa Tablets if you are

taking a type of medicine called a ‘monoamine

oxidase inhibitor’ (MAO inhibitor) used to treat

depression.

It is especially important to talk to your doctor

or pharmacist if you are taking any of the

following:

alprostadil used to treat erectile

dysfunction

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory

drugs) which are used to relieve pain

medicines used to treat anxiety or

insomnia (e.g. diazepam, temazepam)

antihypertensive medicines such as

beta-blockers or calcium-channel blockers

or diuretics (also known as `water tablets')

used to treat high blood pressure (e.g.

propranolol, nifedipine, verapamil or

furosemide)

corticosteroids (e.g. prednisolone,

hydrocortisone)

medicines to treat Parkinson's disease

such as levodopa or entacapone

moxisylyte, used to treat Raynaud's

syndrome

muscle relaxants such as baclofen,

tizanidine

nitrates (e.g. glycerol trinitrate “GTN”,

isosorbide dinitrate/mononitrate)

combined oral contraceptive (“the pill”) or

hormone replacement therapy (HRT)

lithium - used to treat some types of

depression

medicines called 'phenothiazines' such as

chlorpromazine

used for mental illness

and sometimes feeling and being sick

medicines called 'tricyclic antidepressants'

used to treat depression

sympathomimetics medicines used mainly

for coughs and colds (e.g. ephedrine or

salbutamol)

iron and supplements containing iron,

such as multivitamins with minerals.

If you are not sure if any of the above applies

to you, talk to your doctor or pharmacist

before taking Methyldopa Tablets.

Surgery

If you have to have surgery, including dental,

that requires an anaesthetic, you must inform

the dentist or hospital that you are taking

Methyldopa Tablets.

Methyldopa Tablets with alcohol

You are advised not to drink alcohol while

taking Methyldopa Tablets. Discuss this with

your doctor if you have any questions.

Laboratory tests

Your doctor may do blood tests to check how

your liver is working during the first 6 – 12

weeks. He or she may use similar tests if you

have a fever at any time while you are taking

methyldopa.

Tell your doctor that you are taking

methyldopa if you are having a blood or urine

test, as this medicine may affect the results of

certain laboratory tests.

Rarely, in patients taking methyldopa, urine

may darken when it is exposed to air after

voiding.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

If you are pregnant or breast-feeding,

think you may be pregnant or are

planning to have a baby, ask your

doctor or pharmacist for advice

before taking this medicine.

Driving and using machines

You may feel drowsy or light-headed

while taking Methyldopa Tablets.

If this happens do not drive or use

any tools or machines.

3. How to take Methyldopa Tablets

Always take this medicine exactly as your

doctor or pharmacist has told you. Check with

your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.

You should take this medicine by mouth and

exactly as advised by your doctor or

pharmacist. The amount you take each day

will depend on your condition. It is important to

continue taking Methyldopa Tablets for as long

as your doctor has prescribed. Do not take

more or less than your doctor has prescribed.

The breakline is not intended for breaking

the tablet.

Recommended dose

Adults

The usual starting dose for the first two

days is 250 mg two or three times a day

Your doctor may then change your dose

depending on how you respond

You should not take more than 3000 mg in

a day.

The elderly

The usual starting dose will not be more

than 250 mg each day

Your doctor may then slowly increase the

dose

You should not usually take more than

2000 mg in a day.

Children

The doctor will work out the number of tablets.

The dose is based on the weight of the child.

The usual starting dose is 10 mg for each

kg of body weight each day

This dose is taken in two to four doses

during the day

Your doctor may then change the dose

depending on how the child responds

A child will not usually take more than

65 mg for each kg (or 3000 mg a day),

whichever is less.

If you take more Methyldopa Tablets than

you should

If you realise that you have taken more

Methyldopa Tablets than your doctor has

recommended (or if someone else has taken

some of your Methyldopa Tablets), contact

your doctor right away. If you cannot contact

your doctor, go to your nearest hospital

casualty department and take the pack with

you.

If you forget to take Methyldopa Tablets

If you forget to take a dose, just take the next

dose at the usual time. Do not take a double

dose to make up for a forgotten dose.

If you stop taking Methyldopa Tablets

Do not stop taking Methyldopa Tablets without

talking to your doctor.

If you have any further questions on the use

of this medicine, ask your doctor or

pharmacist.

4. Possible side effects

Like all medicines, this medicine can cause

unwanted side effects, although not

everybody gets them.

Contact your doctor IMMEDIATELY if you

have any of the following side effects as they

are serious and require medical attention:

an allergic reaction – symptoms such as

shortness of breath, skin rash or itching,

hives, swelling of your lips, face or

tongue, chills or

fever or painful joints

chest pain, slow heart rate, existing

angina made worse, problems with the

electrical current in the heart (AV block)

severe skin reactions (such as painful

reddening, followed by blistering and

peeling of layers of skin)

liver problems, including jaundice and

hepatitis - signs include yellowing of your

skin and eyes, sometimes with a fever,

pale stools and dark urine

pain in the gut and diarrhoea caused by

inflammation of the bowel (colitis)

severe pain in the gut and back caused by

inflammation of the pancreas

(pancreatitis)

reduction in red blood cells (anaemia) –

this can make your skin pale and make

you weak or breathless

abnormal blood test causing symptoms

such as pale skin, tiredness, fever and

sore throat

having movements you cannot control

The following reactions have also been

reported:

Blood:

bruising and prolonged

bleeding after injury

your medicine may alter the

numbers and types of your

blood cells and cause a

rise in urea in the blood

Nervous system:

feeling sleepy or tired - this

may happen at the start of

treatment or when the dose

is increased, and usually

goes away

headache or feeling weak – this may

happen at the start of treatment and

usually goes away

pins and needles

Bells' Palsy (weakness or paralysis of the

muscles on one side of the face)

Parkinsonism – with symptoms such as

tremor, a decrease in body movements

with an inability to move your muscles

confusion

frequent dizziness or fainting

dizziness due to low blood pressure and

light-headedness (particularly when

standing up quickly)

Nose and chest:

nasal stuffiness

Stomach and gut:

feeling sick

being sick

abdominal pain

feeling bloated

constipation

excess wind

diarrhoea

dry mouth

sore or black tongue

Skin and hair:

skin rash or peeling skin

Joints and muscles:

painful and/or swollen joints

muscle pains

Infections:

swelling of salivary glands

General:

water retention causing swelling and

weight gain

fever

Sexual:

breast enlargement

breast development in men

loss of periods in women

abnormal production of milk

changes in sexual function such as

impotence and not being able to ejaculate

decreased sex drive

Psychiatric:

mental changes, including nightmares or

depression

delusions and paranoia - which will stop

when you stop taking this medicine

Laboratory tests:

Your doctor may need to carry out simple

blood tests during the first few months of

therapy with methyldopa. Results could

show:

o a decrease in blood cell production

o an increase in some white blood cells

o abnormal levels of prolactin

Methyldopa Tablets may also interfere with the

interpretation of certain blood and urine tests.

Reporting of side effects

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor

or pharmacist. This includes any possible side

effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also

report side effects directly via the Yellow Card

Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard

By reporting side effects, you can help provide

more information on the safety of this

medicine.

5. How to store Methyldopa

Tablets

Keep this medicine out of the sight and reach

of children.

Do not store above 25°C.

Container (125 mg): Keep the container tightly

closed and store in the original container.

Blister pack (250 mg and 500 mg): Store in the

original package.

Do not use this medicine after the expiry date

that is stated on the carton, label or blister after

EXP. The expiry date refers to the last day of

that month.

Do not throw away any medicines via waste-

water or household waste. Ask your pharmacist

how to throw away medicines you no longer

use. These measures will help protect the

environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other

information

What Methyldopa Tablets contain

Each film-coated tablet contains 125 mg,

250 mg or 500 mg of the active ingredient

methyldopa (anhydrous).

The other ingredients are anhydrous citric acid,

povidone, sodium starch glycollate, stearic

acid, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline

cellulose, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose,

Opaspray Yellow M-1F-6047B solids (which

includes titanium dioxide (E171), yellow iron

oxide (E172) and Quinoline yellow (E104)).

What Methyldopa Tablets look like and

contents of the pack

Methyldopa 125 mg Tablets are yellow, round,

film coated tablets, embossed with “MT/125”

separated by a breakline.

Methyldopa 250 mg Tablets are yellow, round,

film coated tablets, embossed with “MT/250”

separated by a breakline.

Methyldopa 500 mg Tablets are yellow, round,

film coated tablets, embossed with “MT/500”

separated by a breakline.

Methyldopa 125 mg Tablets are packed in

containers of 56 tablets.

Methyldopa 250 mg Tablets and Methyldopa

500 mg Tablets are available as blister packs

of 56 tablets.

Marketing Authorisation Holder and

Manufacturer:

Marketing Authorisation Holder

Sovereign Medical, Sovereign House

Miles Gray Road, Basildon, Essex

SS14 3FR, UK

Manufacturer

Waymade Plc, Sovereign House

Miles Gray Road, Basildon, Essex

SS14 3FR, UK

This leaflet was last revised in July 2017

PL 06464/1432

Methyldopa 125 mg Tablets

PL 06464/1433

Methyldopa 250 mg Tablets

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