AG-URSODIOL TABLET

Canada - English - Health Canada

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Active ingredient:
URSODIOL
Available from:
ANGITA PHARMA INC.
ATC code:
A05AA02
INN (International Name):
URSODEOXYCHOLIC ACID
Dosage:
500MG
Pharmaceutical form:
TABLET
Composition:
URSODIOL 500MG
Administration route:
ORAL
Units in package:
100
Prescription type:
Prescription
Therapeutic area:
CHOLELITHOLYTIC AGENTS
Product summary:
Active ingredient group (AIG) number: 0122789002; AHFS: 56:14.00
Authorization status:
APPROVED
Authorization number:
02505371
Authorization date:
2020-09-23

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AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 1 of 29

PRODUCT MONOGRAPH

Pr

AG-Ursodiol

Ursodiol Tablets, USP

250 mg & 500 mg Tablets

Bile Acid Preparation

Angita Pharma Inc.

1310 rue Nobel

Boucherville, Québec

J4B 5H3

Date of Revision:

September 21, 2020

Submission Control Number: 243364

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 2 of 29

Table of Contents

PART I: HEALTH PROFESSIONAL INFORMATION ......................................................... 3

SUMMARY PRODUCT INFORMATION ..................................................................... 3

INDICATIONS AND CLINICAL USE ........................................................................... 3

CONTRAINDICATIONS ................................................................................................. 4

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ................................................................................ 4

ADVERSE REACTIONS .................................................................................................. 5

DRUG INTERACTIONS ................................................................................................ 10

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION ............................................................................ 11

OVERDOSAGE ............................................................................................................... 12

ACTION AND CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY ........................................................ 12

STORAGE AND STABILITY ........................................................................................ 13

SPECIAL HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS .................................................................... 13

DOSAGE FORMS, COMPOSITION AND PACKAGING ......................................... 14

PART II: SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION ............................................................................... 15

PHARMACEUTICAL INFORMATION ...................................................................... 15

CLINICAL TRIALS ........................................................................................................ 16

DETAILED PHARMACOLOGY .................................................................................. 18

TOXICOLOGY ................................................................................................................ 19

REFERENCES ................................................................................................................. 22

PART III: CONSUMER INFORMATION .............................................................................. 26

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 3 of 29

Pr

AG-Ursodiol

Ursodiol tablets,

USP

250 mg & 500 mg

PART I: HEALTH PROFESSIONAL INFORMATION

SUMMARY PRODUCT INFORMATION

Route of

Administration

Dosage Form /

Strength

Clinically Relevant Non-medicinal Ingredients

Oral

tablet 250 mg, 500 mg

None

For a complete listing see DOSAGE FORMS,

COMPOSITION AND PACKAGING section.

INDICATIONS AND CLINICAL USE

AG-Ursodiol (ursodiol), also known as ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is indicated for:

the management of cholestatic liver diseases, such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC).

Cholestatic liver diseases are characterized by a decrease in bile secretion and bile flow. Caution

has to be exercised to maintain the bile flow of the patients taking UDCA.

The diagnosis of cholestatic liver diseases is based on the biochemical signs of cholestasis (such as

an increase in alkaline phosphatase, γ-GT, bilirubin), and also an increase in IgM levels and the

presence of antimitochondrial antibodies in PBC.

The monitoring of AG-Ursodiol in the management of cholestatic liver diseases should be based on

the biochemical parameters of cholestasis, as described above, as well as on signs of

hepatic

cytolysis (such as AST, ALT) which are very often associated with cholestasis during the

progression of the diseases.

Serum liver function tests (γ-GT, alkaline phosphatase, AST, ALT) and bilirubin level should be

monitored every month for three months after start of therapy, and every six months thereafter.

Improved serum liver function tests (e.g. AST, ALT) do not always correlate with improved

disease status. In addition to identifying responsive and non-responsive patients, this monitoring

will allow the early detection of a possible deterioration of the hepatic function. For patients who

have a recent history of adequate biochemical response to the treatment, UDCA discontinuation

should be considered when serum liver function tests increase to a level considered clinically

significant, generally increase in ALT, AST levels three times the baseline value and increase in

total bilirubin to twice the baseline value, confirmed by repeated tests. (see WARNINGS and

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 4 of 29

PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE and ADMINISTRATION).

AG-Ursodiol is not indicated for the treatment of decompensated cirrhosis.

Geriatrics:

Appropriate studies with AG-Ursodiol have not been performed in the geriatric population.

However, geriatric-specific problems that would limit the use or usefulness of AG-Ursodiol in the

elderly are not expected.

Pediatrics:

The safety and effectiveness of AG-Ursodiol in children have not been established.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Patients with complete biliary obstruction of extrahepatic origin

; patients with widespread intrahepatic

obstruction and patients who are hypersensitive to ursodiol or to any ingredient in the formulation

For a

complete listing, see the DOSAGE FORMS, COMPOSITION AND PACKAGING section of the

product monograph.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis

AG-Ursodiol have no carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic effects in laboratory animals treated

at higher doses than those intended for therapy in humans, and after long-term treatment (see

TOXICOLOGY).

Hepatic/Biliary/Pancreatic

Patients with variceal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy, ascites, or in need of an urgent liver

transplant, should receive appropriate specific treatment. Caution should be exercised when UDCA

is administered in a setting of partial biliary obstruction of extra-hepatic origin.

Special Populations

Pregnant Women: There are no adequate or well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Because

animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, AG-Ursodiol should not

be used in women who are or may become pregnant. If this drug is used during pregnancy or if the

patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised

of the potential

hazard to the foetus. (See also TOXICOLOGY.)

Nursing Women: It is not known whether ursodiol is excreted in human milk. Since many drugs

are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when AG-Ursodiol is administered to a

nursing mother.

Pediatrics: The safety and effectiveness of AG-Ursodiol in children have not been established.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 5 of 29

Geriatrics: Appropriate studies with AG-Ursodiol have not been performed in the geriatric

population. However, geriatric-specific problems that would limit the use or usefulness of AG-

Ursodiol in the elderly are not expected.

Monitoring and Laboratory Tests

Lithocholic acid, one of the metabolites of ursodeoxycholic acid is hepatotoxic unless it is

effectively detoxified in the liver. Therefore, the following tests are important for patient

monitoring:

Serum liver function tests (γ-GT, alkaline phosphatase, AST, ALT) and bilirubin levels should be

monitored every month for three months after start of therapy, and every six months thereafter.

Serial monitoring will allow for the early detection of a possible deterioration of the hepatic

function. Serum levels of these parameters usually decrease rapidly. Improved serum liver tests

(e.g. AST, ALT) do not always correlate with improved disease status. For patients who have a

recent history of adequate biochemical response to the treatment, UDCA discontinuation should be

considered when serum liver function tests increase to a level considered clinically significant (see

DOSAGE and ADMINISTRATION and WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS).

Caution has to be exercised to maintain the bile flow of the patients taking UDCA.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Adverse Drug Reaction Overview

Adverse events observed in clinical trials are tabulated and described below. In a 180 patient

placebo-controlled trial in primary biliary cirrhosis, the common adverse events (i.e. ≥ 1 %)

included leukopenia, skin rash, diarrhea, blood creatinine increased, blood glucose increased, and

peptic ulcer. In a second trial with 60 patients, the frequency of treatment-emergent adverse event

reporting was higher with the most common (defined as ≥ 5%) being asthenia, dyspepsia, edema

peripheral, hypertension, nausea, GI disorder, chest pain, and pruritus. In this second trial there

were 4 serious adverse events: 1 patient with diabetes mellitus, 1 patient with breast nodule and 2

patients with fibrocystic breast disease. None of these events were considered related to the

medication. At the recommended dosage, ursodiol is well-tolerated and has no significant adverse

events.

Clinical Trial Adverse Drug Reactions

Because clinical trials are conducted under very specific conditions the adverse reaction

rates observed in the clinical trials may not reflect the rates observed in practice and

should not be compared to the rates in the clinical trials of another drug. Adverse drug

reaction information from clinical trials is useful for identifying drug-related adverse events

and for approximating rates.

The adverse reactions in Table 1 below were observed in clinical trials in primary biliary cirrhosis

with 180 patients (89 randomized to ursodiol treatment, 91 to placebo treatment). Adverse events

are reported regardless of attribution to the test medication. Adverse reactions occurring at a rate of

1% or higher in the ursodiol

group, and that are higher than placebo are included in Table 1.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 6 of 29

Diarrhea and thrombocytopenia at 12 months, nausea/vomiting, fever and other side effects are not

included, because they occurred at the same rate or a lower rate than placebo.

Table 1: Adverse events with a frequency ≥ 1% Observed in a Clinical Trial of 180 patients

UDCA=Ursodeoxycholic acid=Ursodiol

Note: Those AEs occurring at the same or higher incidence in the placebo as in the UDCA group

have been deleted from this table (this includes diarrhea and thrombocytopenia at 12 months, nausea/vomiting, fever and

other toxicity).

In a randomized, cross over study in sixty PBC patients, four patients experienced one serious

adverse event each (diabetes mellitus, breast nodule, and fibrocystic breast disease (2 patients)).

No deaths occurred in the study. Forty-three patients (43/71.7%) experienced at least one

treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAEs) during the study. The most common (defined as ≥5%)

TEAEs were asthenia, (11.7%), dyspepsia (10%), edema peripheral (8.3%), hypertension (8.3%),

nausea (8.3%), GI disorders (5%), chest pain (5%), and pruritus (5%). These nine TEAEs included

abdominal pain and asthenia (1 patient), nausea (3 patients), dyspepsia (2 patients), and anorexia

and esophagitis (1 patient each). One patient on the BID regimen (total dose 1000 mg) withdrew

due to nausea. All of these nine TEAEs except esophagitis were observed with the BID regimen at

a total daily dose of 1000 mg or greater.

Table 2: Treatment-Emergent Adverse Events (TEAEs) with a Frequency of ≥ 1 % Observed in a Clinical

Trial of 60 PBC patients

Adverse event

(ordered by MedDRA System Organ Class)

TEAEs, n(%)

Blood and lymphatic system

disorders

Anemia

1 (1.7)

Lymphadenopathy

2 (3.3)

Cardiac disorders

Arrhythmia

2 (3.3)

Cardiovascular disorder

2 (3.3)

Ear and labyrinth disorders

Deafness

1 (1.7)

Vertigo

1 (1.7)

Eye disorders

Cataract

2 (3.3)

Eye disorder

1 (1.7)

Retinal disorder

1 (1.7)

Gastrointestinal disorders

Abdominal pain

2 (3.3)

Diarrhea

2 (3.3)

Dyspepsia

6 (10)

Adverse event

(ordered by MedDRA

System Organ Class)

Visit at 12 Months

Visit at 24 Months

UDCA

1

n (%)

Placebo

n (%)

UDCA

1

n (%)

Placebo

n (%)

Blood and lymphatic

system disorders

Leukopenia

2 (2.63)

Gastrointestinal disorders

Diarrhea

1 (1.32)

Peptic ulcer

1 (1.32)

Investigations

Blood creatinine

increased

1 (1.32)

Blood glucose

increased

1 (1.18)

1 (1.32)

Skin and subcutaneous

tissue disorders

Rash

2 (2.63)

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 7 of 29

Adverse event

(ordered by MedDRA System Organ Class)

TEAEs, n (%)

Dysphagia

1 (1.7)

Esophagitis

1 (1.7)

Flatulence

1 (1.7)

Gastrointestinal disorder

3 (5.0)

Nausea

5 (8.3)

Salivary gland enlargement

1 (1.7)

Stomach ulcer

1 (1.7)

General disorders and

administration site conditions

Asthenia

7 (11.7)

Chest pain

3 (5.0)

Chest pain substernal

1 (1.7)

Cyst

1 (1.7)

Edema

5 (8.3)

Edema generalized

1 (1.7)

Edema peripheral

5 (8.3)

Granuloma

1 (1.7)

Hemorrhagic ulcer

1 (1.7)

Pain

1 (1.7)

Hepatobiliary disorders

Biliary pain

1 (1.7)

Immune system disorders

Amyloidosis

1 (1.7)

Infections and infestations

Bronchitis

1 (1.7)

Cystitis

1 (1.7)

Herpes simplex

1 (1.7)

Infection

1 (1.7)

Otitis media

1 (1.7)

Pharyngitis

1 (1.7)

Pneumonia

1 (1.7)

Rhinitis

2 (3.3)

Urinary tract infection

1 (1.7)

Vaginitis

1 (1.7)

Metabolism and nutrition

disorders

Anorexia

1 (1.7)

Diabetes mellitus

2 (3.3)

Musculoskeletal and connective

tissue disorders

Back pain

1 (1.7)

Bone disorder

1 (1.7)

Bone fracture spontaneous

1 (1.7)

Neoplasms benign, malignant and

unspecified (incl cysts and

polyps)

Breast neoplasm

1 (1.7)

Lung nodule

1 (1.7)

Plantar warts

1 (1.7)

Nervous system disorders

Dizziness

2 (3.3)

Headache

1 (1.7)

Migraine

1 (1.7)

Paresthesia

1 (1.7)

Reproductive system and breast

disorders

Breast nodule

1 (1.7)

Fibrocystic breast disease

2 (3.3)

Menorrhagia

1 (1.7)

Respiratory, thoracic and

mediastinal disorders

Dyspnea

1 (1.7)

Lung disorder

1 (1.7)

Respiratory disorder

1 (1.7)

Sore nose

2 (3.3)

Skin and subcutaneous tissue

disorders

Acne

2 (3.3)

Miliaria

1 (1,7)

Pruritus

3 (5.0)

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 8 of 29

Less Common Clinical Trial Adverse Drug Reactions (<1%)

Analysis of the data in the trial with 180 patients (Table 1) revealed no reports of adverse events at

rates <1 % with the exception of those adverse events that occurred at the same or at a higher

incidence in the treatment group than placebo. No data for TEAEs occurring at rates <1 % in the

trial of 60 patients (Table 2) are available due to the small sample size.

Abnormal Hematologic and Clinical Chemistry Findings

In the placebo-controlled trial with 180 patients, change from baseline in hematologic parameters

and non-hepatic clinical chemistry were analyzed. Statistically significant differences from

baseline are reported in Tables 3 and 4.

Table 3: Hematologic Parameters: Changes from Baseline

Baseline

Endpoint

Change from Baseline

UDCA

Placebo

UDCA

Placebo

UDCA

( SD)

Placebo

( SD)

WBC

Mean

-0.5**

-0.5

( SD)

(2.0)

(4.1)

(1.6)

(2.4)

(1.4)

(4.3)

Platelets

Mean

238.5

245.4

211.2

223.9

-29.4**

-17.7*

( SD)

(92.5)

(112.4)

(87.2)

(94.3)

(39.3)

(58.0)

* Statistically different from zero, p < 0.05

**Statistically different from zero, p < 0.01

There was a significant decrease (p<0.01) in WBC and platelets in the UDCA-treated group from

baseline and a significant (p<0.05) decrease in platelets in the placebo group. There was no

significant change in haemoglobin.

Adverse

event

(ordered by MedDRA System Organ Class)

TEAEs, n (%)

Psoriasis

1 (1.7)

Rash

1 (1.7)

Skin

disorder

2 (3.3)

Skin

hypertrophy

1 (1.7)

Vascular disorders

Hypertension

5 (8.3)

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 9 of 29

Table 4: Clinical Chemistries: Changes from Baseline

Baseline

Endpoint

Change from Baseline

UDCA

Placebo

UDCA

Placebo

UDCA

( SD)

Placebo

( SD)

Calcium

(mg/dL)

Mean

( SD)

9.49

(0.40)

9.47

(0.40)

9.39

(0.43)

9.30

(0.51)

-0.12**

(0.37)

-0.19**

(0.37)

Cholesterol

(mg/dL)

Mean

( SD)

287.73

(121.12)

276.03

(105.22)

223.53

(56.80)

261.46

(83.53)

-67.39**

(93.31)

-11.32*

(47.70)

Creatinine

(mg/dL)

Mean

( SD)

0.86

(0.19)

0.84

(0.21)

0.92

(0.19)

0.92

(0.26)

0.07**

(0.18)

0.07**

(0.23)

Total

Thyroxine

( g/dL)

Mean

( SD)

8.66

(1.63)

8.60

(2.27)

7.96

(1.87)

8.27

(3.25)

-0.69*

(1.52)

11.76*

(44.38)

-0.49

(2.52)

3.00

(56.74)

Triglycerides

(mg/dL)

Mean

( SD)

102.82

(49.25)

117.11

(70.57)

114.18

(55.13)

121.52

(57.56)

** Statistically different from zero, p < 0.01

* Statistically different from zero, p < 0.05

p = ns, UDCA versus placebo

p = 0.0001, UDCA versus placebo

All the non-hepatic clinical chemistries at baseline were not significantly different (p>0.05)

between the UDCA- and placebo- treated groups. In the UDCA group there was a significant

(p>0.05) decrease from baseline in calcium, cholesterol and total thyroxine and a significant

increase (p>0.05) in creatinine and triglycerides. In the placebo group there was a significant

(p>0.05) decrease in cholesterol and significant increase (p>0.05) in calcium and creatinine. There

was no significant change seen for sodium, potassium, phosphorus, HDL, and AMA.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 10 of 29

Post-Market Adverse Drug Reactions

The following adverse reactions, presented by system organ class in alphabetical order, have been

identified during post-approval use of ursodiol. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily

from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or

establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Blood and lymphatic system disorders: anemia, eosinophilia, leukopenia,

neutropenia, thrombocytopenia.

Cardiac disorders: palpitations.

Gastrointestinal disorders: abdominal discomfort, abdominal pain, cheilitis, constipation,

diarrhea, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting.

General disorders and administration site conditions: malaise, peripheral edema, pyrexia.

Hepatobiliary disorders: jaundice (or aggravation of pre-existing jaundice)

Immune system disorders: angioedema and laryngeal edema, drug hypersensitivity to

include facial edema, urticaria.

Investigations: blood glucose increased, blood urine present, weight decreased, weight

increased, ALT increased, AST increased, blood alkaline phosphatase increased, blood

bilirubin increased, γ-GT increased, transaminases increased. Rare instances of severe

liver injury (elevated values for ALT/AST, ALP, γ-GTP and total bilirubin) have been

reported with ursodiol.

Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: myalgia

Nervous system disorders: dizziness, headache.

Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: cough, interstitial lung disease.

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorder: alopecia, dermatitis exfoliative, drug eruption,

erythema, lichenoid keratosis, photosensitivity reaction, pruritus, rash.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Overview

Bile acid sequestering agents may interfere with the action of AG-Ursodiol by reducing absorption.

Aluminum based antacids adsorb bile acids in vitro and may act in the same manner as

sequestering agents, thereby interfering with the action of AG-Ursodiol. Ursodiol has been shown

to be an inducer of CYP3A however the clinical relevance is not known. Metabolic interactions

with compounds metabolized by cytochrome P4503A are to be expected.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 11 of 29

Drug-Drug Interactions

Table 5: Drug-Drug Interactions

Effect

Clinical comment

Bile acid sequestrants (i.e.

cholestyramine or cholestipol)

Reduces ursodiol absorption

May interfere with the action of AG-

Ursodiol

Aluminum based antacids

Reduces ursodiol absorption

Adsorbs bile acid in vitro

May be expected to interfere with AG-

Ursodiol

Cytochrome P4503A

substrates cyclosporine,

nitrendipine and dapsone

Metabolic interaction.

Metabolic interactions with compounds

metabolized by cytochrome P4503A are to

be expected.

Drug-Food Interactions

Interactions with food have not been established.

Drug-Herb Interactions

Interactions with herbal products have not been established.

Drug-Laboratory Interactions

Interactions with laboratory tests have not been established.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Dosing Considerations

Patient Monitoring: Serum liver function tests (γ-GT, alkaline phosphatase, AST, ALT) and

bilirubin level should be monitored every month for three months after start of therapy, and every

six months thereafter. Serial monitoring will allow for the early detection of a possible deterioration

of the hepatic function. Serum levels of these parameters usually decrease rapidly. Improved serum

liver tests (e.g. AST, ALT) do not always correlate with improved disease status. For patients who

have a recent history of adequate biochemical response to the treatment, UDCA discontinuation

should be considered when serum liver function tests increase to a level considered clinically

significant (see INDICATIONS and CLINICAL USE and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS).

Caution has to be exercised to maintain the bile flow of the patients taking UDCA .

Recommended Dose

The recommended adult dosage for AG-Ursodiol in the treatment of PBC is 13-15 mg/kg/day

administered in two to four divided doses with food. The AG-Ursodiol, 500mg

scored tablet can

be broken in halves to provide recommended dosage.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next

dose, skip the dose you missed and take your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double

dose.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 12 of 29

OVERDOSAGE

Accidental or intentional overdosage with ursodiol has not been reported. The most severe

manifestation of overdosage would likely consist of diarrhea that should be treated

symptomatically.

Symptoms of acute toxicity in animal studies were salivation and vomiting in dogs, and ataxia,

dyspnea, ptosis, agonal convulsions and coma in hamsters.

ACTION AND CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism of Action

Ursodiol, a naturally occurring hydrophilic bile acid, derived from cholesterol, is present as a minor

fraction of the total human bile acid pool. Oral administration of ursodiol increases this fraction in

a dose related manner, to become the major biliary acid, replacing/displacing toxic concentrations

of endogenous hydrophobic bile acids that tend to accumulate in cholestatic liver disease.

Multiple mechanisms of action at the cellular and molecular level in addition to the replacement

and displacement of toxic bile acids include cytoprotection of the injured bile duct epithelial cells

(cholangiocytes) against toxic effects of bile acids, inhibition of apoptosis of hepatocytes,

immunomodulatory effects via a number of mechanisms including decreasing expression of MHC

class I proteins on hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and stimulation of bile secretion by hepatocytes

and cholangiocytes.

The cholesterol-lowering effect observed following the administration of AG-Ursodiol in patients

with primary biliary cirrhosis could be related to an improvement of cholestasis, modifications in

cholesterol metabolism, or both. Changes in the endogenous bile acid composition induced by

AG-Ursodiol might be the common denominator of these two mechanisms.

Pharmacodynamics

During chronic administration, ursodiol becomes a major biliary and plasma bile acid. At a chronic

dose of 13-15 mg/kg/day, ursodiol constitutes 30-50% of biliary and plasma bile acids.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption: Ursodiol (UDCA) is normally present as a minor fraction of the total bile acids in

humans (about 5%). Following oral administration, the majority of ursodiol is absorbed by passive

diffusion and its absorption is incomplete.

Distribution: In healthy subjects, at least 70% of ursodiol (unconjugated) is bound to plasma

protein. No information is available on the binding of conjugated ursodiol to plasma protein in

For management of a suspected drug overdose, contact your regional Poison Control Centre.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 13 of 29

healthy subjects or primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients. However, since the efficacy of

ursodiol is related to its concentration in bile rather than in plasma, serum levels are not indicative

of bioavailability in clinical settings. Its volume of distribution has not been determined, but is

expected to be small since the drug is mostly distributed in the bile and small intestine. In bile,

UDCA concentration reaches a peak in 1-3 hours.

Metabolism: Once absorbed, ursodiol undergoes hepatic extraction to the extent of about 70% in

the absence of liver disease. This leads to low blood levels in the systemic circulation. As the

severity of liver disease increases, the extent of extraction decreases. In the liver, ursodiol is

conjugated with glycine or taurine, then secreted into bile. These conjugates of ursodiol are

absorbed in the small intestine by passive and active mechanisms. The conjugates can also be

deconjugated in the ileum by intestinal enzymes, leading to the formation of free ursodiol that can

be reabsorbed and reconjugated in the liver. Nonabsorbed ursodiol passes into the colon where it is

mostly 7-dehydroxylated to lithocholic acid. Some ursodiol is epimerized to chenodiol (CDCA)

via a 7-oxo intermediate. Chenodiol also undergoes 7-dehydroxylation to form lithocholic acid.

These metabolites are poorly soluble and excreted in the feces. A small portion of lithocholic acid

is reabsorbed, conjugated in the liver with glycine or taurine, and sulfated at the 3 position. The

resulting sulfated lithocholic acid conjugates are excreted in bile and then lost in feces.

Lithocholic acid, when administered chronically to animals, causes cholestatic liver injury that may

lead to death from liver failure in certain species unable to form sulfate conjugates. Ursodiol is 7-

dehydroxylated more slowly than chenodiol. For equimolar doses of ursodiol and chenodiol,

steady state levels of lithocholic acid in biliary bile acids are lower during ursodiol administration

than with chenodiol administration. Humans and chimpanzees can sulfate lithocholic acid.

Although liver injury has not been associated with ursodiol therapy, a reduced capacity to sulfate

may exist in some individuals. Nonetheless, such a deficiency has not yet been clearly

demonstrated and must be extremely rare, given the several thousand patient-years of clinical

experience with ursodiol.

Excretion: Ursodiol is excreted primarily in the feces. With treatment, urinary excretion increases,

but remains less than 1%, except in severe cholestatic liver disease.

STORAGE AND STABILITY

AG-Ursodiol tablets should be stored at controlled room temperature at 15°C - 30°C in a closed

container.

Half-tablets (scored AG-Ursodiol 500 mg tablets broken in half) maintain acceptable quality for up

to 28 days when stored in the current packaging (bottles) at 15°C – 30°C.

SPECIAL HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS

To prevent leakage of the active medicinal ingredient (ursodiol) from the cut tablets onto the

surface of whole tablets and spreading the bitter taste, it is recommended that cut tablets be stored

separately from whole tablets

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 14 of 29

DOSAGE FORMS, COMPOSITION AND PACKAGING

250 mg tablet

AG-Ursodiol (ursodiol) is available in a strength of 250 mg as a white, elliptical, biconvex, film-

coated tablet, engraved with “ J250" on one side and plain on other side . Available as bottles of

100 or 500 tablets .

500 mg tablet

AG-Ursodiol (ursodiol) is available in a strength of 500 mg as a white, elliptical, biconvex,

scored, film-coated tablet, engraved with “J500" on one side and a breakline on the other side.

Available as bottles of 100 tablets.

In addition to ursodiol as the active ingredient, AG-Ursodiol contain the following excipients:

microcrystalline cellulose, sodium starch glycolate, povidone ,sodium lauryl sulfate, colloidal

anhydrous silica, magnesium stearate, opadry (hypromellose and polyethylene glycol).

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

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PART II: SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION

PHARMACEUTICAL INFORMATION

Drug Substance

Proper name:

Ursodiol

Chemical name:

3α, 7β-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid

Molecular formula and molecular mass: C

392.6

Structural formula:

Physicochemical properties:

Description:

Ursodiol is a naturally occurring bile acid in man. Ursodiol is a

bitter-tasting, white or almost white, crystalline powder.

Solubility:

Ursodiol is practically insoluble in water, freely soluble in alcohol

and glacial acetic acid, sparingly soluble in chloroform, and very

slightly soluble in ether.

Melting Range:

200°C - 205°C

pKa:

Alkaline

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

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CLINICAL TRIALS

Comparative Bioavailability Studies

A double-blind, randomized, two-treatment, two-sequence, two-period, single dose, two-way

crossover comparative bioavailability study of Ursodiol Tablets, 500 mg versus URSO DS

(Ursodiol) Tablets, 500 mg of Axcan Pharma Inc., Canada, was conducted in 66 healthy, adult

male subjects under fasting conditions. Bioavailability data were measured and the results are

summarized in the following table.

Unconjugated Ursodiol

(1 x 500 mg)

From Measured data (corrected for baseline)

Geometric Mean

Arithmetic Mean (CV%)

Parameter

Test

Reference

% Ratio of

Geometric

Means

90% Confidence

Interval

0-72

(ng.h/mL)

27142.06

30662.62 (49.53)

29481.88

32938.36 (47.32)

92.06

83.87 - 101.05

(ng/mL)

5131.79

5471.25 (35.43)

5589.73

6000.06 (40.11)

91.81

84.53 - 99.71

2.17 (0.50-16.00)

2.00 (0.500-5.00)

Due to entero-hepatic recycling of ursodiol in the gastrointestinal tract, meaningful estimates of the AUC

and T

parameters could not be derived, and are therefore not reported.

Ursodiol Tablets 500 mg.

URSO DS

(Ursodiol) Tablets, 500 mg (Axcan Pharma Inc.) were purchased in Canada

Expressed as the median (range) only

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

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Study demographics and trial design:

Table 6: Summary of patient demographics for clinical trials in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC)

UDCA = Ursodeoxycholic acid = Ursodiol

U.S. Study: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to

evaluate the efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid at a dose of 13-15 mg/kg/day, administered in 4

divided doses in 180 patients with PBC. Upon completion of the double-blind portion, all patients

entered an open-label, active treatment, extension phase.

Treatment failure, the main efficacy end point measured during this study, was defined as death,

need for liver transplantation, histologic progression by two stages or to cirrhosis, development of

varices, ascites or encephalopathy, marked worsening of fatigue or pruritus, inability to tolerate the

drug, doubling of serum bilirubin and voluntary withdrawal. After two years of double-blind

treatment, the incidence of treatment failure was significantly reduced in the ursodiol

group

(n=89) as compared to the placebo group (n=91). Time to treatment failure was also significantly

delayed in the ursodiol

treated group, regardless of either histologic stage or baseline bilirubin

levels (>1.8

or ≤1.8 mg/dL).

Using a definition of treatment failure which excluded doubling of serum bilirubin and voluntary

withdrawal, time to treatment failure was significantly delayed in the ursodiol

group. In

comparison with placebo, treatment with Ursodiol

resulted in a significant improvement in the

following serum hepatic biochemistries when compared to baseline: total bilirubin, AST, alkaline

phosphatase and IgM.

Canadian Study: A second study conducted in Canada randomized 222 PBC patients to ursodiol

14 mg/kg/day (n=111) or placebo (n=111), in a double-blind manner during a two-year period. At

Study

Trial design

UDCA

1

Dosage,

route of

administration

and duration

Study

subjects

(n=number)

Mean age

(Range)

(years)

Gender

US Study

multicenter,

randomized, double-

blind, placebo-

controlled

13-15 mg/kg/day,

administered in 4

divided doses

(n=89), or placebo

(n=91), 2 years

180 patients

with PBC

UCDA:

53.6 (±9.5)

placebo:

51.5 (±9.3)

UCDA:

7 M/89 F

placebo:

12 M/91 F

Canadian

Study

randomized, double-

blind, placebo

controlled

14 mg/kg/day

(n=111), or

placebo (n= 111),

2 years

222 patients

with PBC

UCDA:

57.3

placebo:

55.4

UCDA:

10 M/111 F

placebo:

6 M/111 F

Multinational

Study

multicenter,

multinational (France-

Canada), double-blind,

placebo controlled

13-15 mg/kg/day

(n=72), or placebo

(n=73), 2 years

145 patients

with

histologically

confirmed

biliary

cirrhosis

UCDA:

55 ( ±1)

placebo:

57 (±1)

UCDA:

4 M/72 F

placebo:

8 M/73 F

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 18 of 29

two years, a statistically significant difference between the two treatments, in favor of ursodiol, was

demonstrated by the following: reduction in the proportion of patients exhibiting a more than 50%

increase in serum bilirubin; median percent decrease in bilirubin, transaminases and alkaline

phosphatase, incidence of treatment failure, and time to treatment failure. The definition of

treatment failure included: discontinuing the study for any reason, a total serum bilirubin level

greater than or equal to 1.5 mg/dL or increasing to a level equal to or greater than two times the

baseline level, and the development of ascites or encephalopathy.

Evaluation of patients at 4 years or longer was inadequate due to the high dropout rate and small

number of patients. Therefore, death, need for liver transplantation, histological progression by

two stages or to cirrhosis, development of varices, ascites or encephalopathy, marked worsening of

fatigue or pruritus, inability to tolerate the drug, doubling of serum bilirubin and voluntary

withdrawal were not assessed.

Multinational Study: A two-year multicenter, multinational (France-Canada), double-blind study

was conducted to compare the efficacy of ursodiol versus placebo in primary biliary cirrhosis.

Patients with histologically confirmed biliary cirrhosis were randomized to receive either ursodiol

13-15 mg/kg/day (n=72), or placebo (n=73). Treatment failure was defined as a doubling of

bilirubin levels (>70 μmol/L) or the occurrence of severe complications (ascites or variceal

bleeding) or an adverse event.

The results showed that treatment failed in six patients in the ursodiol group, as compared with

thirteen in the placebo group (p<0.01). A single patient in each group withdrew because of minor

adverse effects. After two years of treatment, the proportion of patients with clinically overt

disease decreased only in the ursodiol group (p<0.02). The patients treated with ursodiol had

significant improvements in serum levels of bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, alanine

aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyltransferase, cholesterol, and IgM

(all p<0.01); the antimitochondrial antibody titer (p<0.01); and the Mayo risk score

(p<0.001). In a follow-up analysis of 95 liver-biopsy specimens, only the group receiving ursodiol

showed a significant improvement in the mean histologic score (p<0.002) and in all the

characteristic histologic features except fibrosis.

At the end of this trial, all patients received ursodiol (13-15 mg/kg/day) and were monitored for an

additional two years, using the same criteria.

After four years, the overall treatment failure rate was 12% in the ursodiol group and 26% in the

original placebo group (p<0.001). Two patients in the ursodiol group had undergone a liver

transplantation, compared to 12 in the original placebo group (p<0.001). Survival was similar in the

two groups: 5 deaths (various causes) occurred in the ursodiol group and 7 in the original placebo

group.

Combined Analysis: The raw data from the above three studies have been combined in order to

estimate, at four years, the magnitude of the effect of ursodiol treatment on survival free of

transplant, defined as time to transplant, or death without transplant.

In these studies, all patients had histologically confirmed, antimitochondrial antibody positive,

primary biliary cirrhosis. They were randomized to receive ursodiol (13-15 mg/kg/day) or identical

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

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placebo. In one study, blinded randomization continued for four years. In two studies, open label

ursodiol was offered to all patients after two years. The endpoint of survival free of liver transplant

was compared between the ursodiol and placebo groups using standard life table analyses.

Analyses were done on an "intent-to-treat" basis. The risk reduction was calculated in order to

define the magnitude of the benefit from ursodiol treatment.

A total of 548 patients were randomized in these studies: 273 received ursodiol and 275, the

placebo. Baseline characteristics were comparable at entry in both groups. Median length of

follow-up was four years in the ursodiol group, and 3.8 years in the original placebo group.

Placebo patients who received ursodiol did so for a mean of one year. There were 47 patients in the

ursodiol group and 68 in the placebo group who did not survive nor needed a liver transplant.

Survival free of transplantation was extended in patients originally randomized to ursodiol when

compared to those on placebo (mean of 3.66 versus 3.45 years, p=0.014). In the ursodiol group the

risk of dying or being transplanted was reduced by 32% (± 11%) of that observed in the original

placebo group.

Unapproved High-Dose Ursodeoxycholic Acid for the Treatment of Primary Sclerosing

Cholangitis: In a recent Clinical Trial (Lindor et al., 2009), one hundred fifty adult patients with

PSC were enrolled in a long-term, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of high-dose (28-

30 mg/kg/day – 1.5 to 2.0 fold the recommended dose) versus placebo. Liver biopsy and

cholangiography were performed before randomization and after 5 years. The primary outcome

measures were development of cirrhosis, varices, cholangiocarcinoma, liver transplantation, or

death. The study was terminated after 6 years due to futility. During therapy, aspartate

aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase levels decreased more in the ursodeoxycholic acid

group than the placebo group (P 0.01), but improvements in liver function tests were not

associated with decreased endpoints. By the end of the study, 30 patients in the ursodeoxycholic

acid group (39%) versus 19 patients in the placebo group (26%) had reached one of the pre-

established clinical endpoints. The risk was 2.1 times greater for death and transplantation in the

ursodeoxycholic acid group versus the placebo group (P = 0.038). Serious adverse events were

more common in the ursodeoxycholic acid group than the placebo group (63% versus 37% [P

0.01]). Long-term, high-dose ursodeoxycholic acid therapy was associated with improvement in

serum liver function tests in PSC but did not improve survival and was associated with higher rates

of serious adverse events.

DETAILED PHARMACOLOGY

Administration of ursodiol to rats, rabbits, hamsters and dogs produced modification of bile

composition. Bile flow increased as did total bile acid output. In the liver, ursodiol decreased

HMG-CoA reductase activity and cholesterol 7-hydroxylase activity. Triglyceride, phospholipid

and cholesterol synthesis were decreased.

Studies have demonstrated that ursodiol acts on the hepatic cells and plays a role in the bile acid

dependent mechanism of bile formation. Its choleretic activity results from its osmotic activity as

well as its stimulating effect on organic ion transport (probably HCO

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In vitro studies showed that tauroursodeoxycholic acid (i.e. in the liver ursodiol is conjugated with

taurine or glycine) decreased cholesterol uptake in rat jejunal membranes by an unknown

mechanism. When ursodiol was perfused into the liver of rats or baboons, bile flow either remained

unchanged or increased, bile acid and phospholipid outputs were increased, while cholesterol

specific activity was decreased. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid caused only little output of plasma

membrane enzyme concentration (5-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphatase), which may represent a

characteristic difference between the effects of chenodiol and ursodiol on the hepatobiliary system.

Ursodiol produced minimal or no effect on water and sodium excretion from the GI tract of rats and

rabbits. It induced less damage to the GI tract mucosa than chenodiol. These observations correlate

well with the clinical findings that diarrhea is infrequent with ursodiol.

Ursodiol lowered blood sugar levels in mice, and increased the volume of pancreatic secretion in

rabbits, thus suggesting a stimulatory effect of ursodiol on the pancreas.

At therapeutic doses, ursodiol uncouples the normal relationship between cholesterol,

phospholipids and bile acid secretion. Ursodiol inhibits cholesterol absorption in the gut, thereby,

reducing cholesterol output into the bile. It further reduces cholesterol secretion into bile. These

actions contribute to biliary cholesterol desaturation.

TOXICOLOGY

Acute Toxicity

Results from various studies indicated that oral, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous

administration of ursodiol in mice, rats, hamsters, and dogs at single doses of 1.21 to 10 g/kg over a

seven-day observation period, did not cause any deaths in any of the species used. For mice and

dogs, the LD

was >10 g/kg, and rats had an LD

over >5 g/kg. Hamsters were found to be more

sensitive than rats and dogs as the LD

for this species was calculated to be >3.16 g/kg.

No significant sex difference was seen. Toxic signs observed included: inhibition of motility, CNS

toxicity such as ataxia and sedation, GI tract disturbances such as vomiting, salivation, decreased

body weight and appetite.

Subacute Toxicity

Two short-term toxicological studies were conducted in rats. Ursodiol was administered orally at a

daily dose of 0.5 to 4.0 g/kg/day for five weeks or alternatively at doses of 0.0625 to 0.5 g/kg daily

for five weeks by the intraperitoneal route.

No deaths occurred in the study with oral administration of ursodiol, whereas, one male and one

female rat died in the 0.25 g/kg group, and six males and four females died in the 0.5 g/kg group of

the study in which ursodiol was administered by the intraperitoneal route. The most marked

autopsy findings were dilation and adhesion of intraperitoneal organs. As these became gradually

more severe, retention of ascites and renal abscesses appeared. It was concluded that 0.0625 g/kg

was the safe dose and 0.125 g/kg was near the maximum tolerable dose.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

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Ursodiol orally administered to rats did not cause any clinical symptoms or any changes in

laboratory parameters.

Chronic Toxicity

Four long-term toxicity studies were performed in rats and monkeys. The results of these studies

are summarized below.

Rat Study: In one study, ursodiol was administered orally to Sprague-Dawley rats for 26 weeks.

The dosage varied between 0.1 and 2.5 g/kg/day and various observations were performed daily.

No deaths occurred during the experimental period. Lower doses (0.1 and 0.5 g/kg) were well

tolerated. However, a 2.5 g/kg dose of ursodiol resulted in significant reduction of body weight

gain and food intake. No significant changes were seen in laboratory findings and clinical

observations.

In the second study, male Wistar rats were given 0.5 to 4.0 g/kg of ursodiol orally for 26

consecutive weeks and a variety of observations were made.

The results indicated a decrease in body weight gain and an increase in water intake in the

4.0 g/kg dosage group. Eight rats (four at the high dose level) died during the experiment. The

cause of death was attributed to pathological changes in the lung and intestine. Laboratory findings

revealed no abnormal changes that might be ascribed to drug administration.

Monkey study: A 26-week study was performed in Rhesus monkeys. ursodiol at doses of

0.04 and 0.10 g/kg/day were given orally.

No deaths occurred during the treatment period. There were no abnormalities in the laboratory

parameters.

In a 52-week study, ursodiol at a dose of 0.05 to 0.9 g/kg was administered to Rhesus monkeys.

The animals were observed daily for various clinical signs and symptoms. They were weighed

weekly, blood and urine was collected and examined every three months. After 52 weeks, the

animals were sacrificed and an autopsy was performed.

Three animals belonging to the 0.90 g/kg group, two in the 0.30 g/kg group and one in the

0.10 g/kg died during the study. These deaths were considered to be related to ursodiol. Liver

toxicity (small round-cell infiltration, vacuolar degeneration, necrosis of hepatic cells, phagocytosis

and hepatic abscess) and thickening of the alveolar wall of the lungs was observed in deceased

animals from all groups. Necrosis of the stomach wall was observed in deceased animals from the

0.90 g/kg group. A regression of body weight gain was seen in the 0.30 and 0.90 g/kg groups.

Episodes of diarrhea were observed in all groups including the control group. No remarkable

changes were noted in hematological, urinary, electrographic, blood pressure and ocular fundi

examinations. However, serum SGPT, AST and ALP increased significantly.

From the above findings, it was concluded that ursodiol, when administered at daily doses

exceeding 0.10 g/kg, caused hepatotoxicity in Rhesus monkeys.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

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Carcinogenicity

In two 24-month oral carcinogenicity studies in mice, ursodiol at doses up to 1,000 mg/kg/day

(3,000 mg/m

/day) was not tumorigenic. Based on body surface area, for a 50 kg person of average

height (1.46 m

body surface area), this dose represents 5.4 times the recommended maximum

clinical dose of 15 mg/kg/day (555 mg/m

/day).

In a two-year oral carcinogenicity study in Fischer 344 rats, ursodiol at doses up to

300 mg/kg/day (1,800 mg/m

/day, 3.2 times the recommended maximum human dose based on

body surface area) was not tumorigenic.

In a life-span (126-138 weeks) oral carcinogenicity study, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with

doses of 33 to 300 mg/kg/day, 0.4 to 3.2 times the recommended maximum human dose based on

body surface area. Ursodiol produced a significantly (p < 0.5, Fisher’s exact test) increased

incidence of pheochromocytomas of the adrenal medulla in females of the highest dose group.

In 103-week oral carcinogenicity studies of lithocholic acid, a metabolite of ursodiol, doses up to

250 mg/kg/day in mice and 500 mg/kg/day in rats did not produce any tumors. In a 78-week rat

study, intrarectal instillation of lithocholic acid (1 mg/kg/day) for 13 months did not produce

colorectal tumors. A tumor-promoting effect was observed when it was administered after a single

intrarectal dose of a known carcinogen N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. On the other hand,

in a 32-week rat study, ursodiol at a daily dose of 240 mg/kg (1,440 mg/m

, 2.6 times the maximum

recommended human dose based on body surface area) suppressed the colonic carcinogenic effect

of another known carcinogen, azoxymethane.

Mutagenicity

Ursodiol was not genotoxic in the Ames test, the mouse lymphoma cell (L5178Y, TK

) forward

mutation test, the human lymphocyte sister chromatid exchange test, the mouse spermatogonia

chromosome aberration test, the Chinese hamster micronucleus test and the Chinese hamster bone

marrow cell chromosome aberration test.

Reproduction and Teratology

Ursodiol did not show any teratogenic effect in mice, rats and rabbits at oral dose levels up to 1.5,

4.0 and 0.3 g/kg, respectively, and in mice and rats at intraperitoneal dose levels up to

g/kg. Furthermore, it did not influence mating performance and fertility, except in one study

where these parameters were slightly reduced in female rats receiving 2.0 g/kg. Breeding capacity

was not altered by the administration of ursodiol.

Oral administration of 1.5 g/kg in mice and 2.0 g/kg in rats induced a decrease in maternal weight

gain and lower mean weights of live fetuses. In addition, the number of resorption sites was

increased in rats at a dose of 2.0 g/kg. Rabbits were much more sensitive than mice and rats to the

toxic action of ursodiol. The administration of doses of 0.1 g/kg and greater caused a decrease in

food consumption, maternal body weight gain and motor activity as well as an increase in

resorption sites, and absorption death.

Intraperitoneal administration of 0.2 g/kg ursodiol to mice and rats induced a decrease in maternal

body weight gain, low fetal weight and an increase of resorption sites.

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AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 26 of 29

acid treated patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Hepatology 1999; 29(6):1668-1671.

Simko V, Michael S, Prego V. Ursodeoxycholic therapy in chronic liver disease: a meta-

analysis in primary biliary cirrhosis and in chronic hepatitis. Am J Gastroenterol 1994;

89(3):392-398.

Lee D, Bonorris G, Cohen H, Gilmore C, Marks J, Schoenfield LJ. Effect of

ursodeoxycholic acid on bile acid kinetics and hepatic lipid secretion. Hepatology 1981;

1:36A.

Logan GM and Duane WC. Lovastatin added to ursodeoxycholic acid further reduces

biliary cholesterol saturation. Gastroenterology 1990; 98(6):1572-1576.

Takahashi H, Tozuka K, Miyashita T, et al. Effects of ursodeoxycholic acid administered to

primipara rats and mice on the prenatal development and postnatal growth of their litters.

Clinical Report 1975; 9(13): 3223-3242.

Toyoshima S, Fujita H, Sato R, Kashima M, Sato S. Reproduction studies with

ursodeoxycholic acid in rats. (I) fertility study. Pharmacometrics 1978; 15(5): 923-930.

Toyoshima S, Fujita H, Sakurai T, Sato R, Kashima M. Reproduction studies with

ursodeoxycholic acid in rats. (II) teratogenicity study. Pharmacometrics 1978; 15(5): 931-

945.

Toyoshima S, Fujita H, Sato R, Kashima M, Sato S. Terotogenicity study of

ursodeoxycholic acid in rabbits. Pharmacometrics 1978; 5(7):1133-1140.

Lindor et al. High-dose ursodeoxycholic acid for the treatment of primary sclerosing

cholangitis. Hepatology 2009; 50(3): 808-814.

Product Monograph, Pr URSO® 250 mg Tablets Pr URSO DS® 500 mg Tablets

APTALIS PHARMA CANADA INC. Date of revision: August 18, 2014, Control

No.: 175562.

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 27 of 29

IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ

PART III: CONSUMER INFORMATION

Pr

AG-Ursodiol

Ursodiol Tablets, USP

250 mg & 500 mg tablets

This leaflet is part III of a three-part "Product

Monograph" and is designed specifically for

Consumers. This leaflet is a summary and will not

tell you everything about AG-Ursodiol.

Contact

your doctor or pharmacist if you have any

questions about the drug.

What the medication is used for:

AG-Ursodiol

has been prescribed for you by

your

physician for the management of cholestatic liver

disease.

AG-Ursodiol is only available by

prescription.

What it does:

AG-Ursodiol contain ursodiol (ER-so-DYE-

all),

which is a naturally occurring bile acid found in

small

quantities in normal human bile.

In patients with cholestatic liver disease the release

flow of bile through the bile ducts are reduced.

taking AG-Ursodiol the amount of ursodiol in

bile increases, changing the make-up of the bile and

causing an increase in bile flow. Ursodiol also works

replacing toxic bile acids that can destroy liver

tissue.

When it should not be used:

Do not take AG-Ursodiol if you:

have an allergy to ursodiol or to any ingredient

the formulation.

have blockage of bile flow due to widespread

liver

disease.

have complete blockage of bile flow due to

disease

outside of the liver.

What the medicinal ingredient is:

Ursodiol

What the nonmedicinal ingredients are:

AG-Ursodiol contain the following excipients:

microcrystalline cellulose, sodium starch

glycolate, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate,

colloidal anhydrous silica, magnesium

stearate, hypromellose and polyethylene

glycol.

What dosage forms it comes in:

250 mg tablet

AG-Ursodiol (ursodiol) is available as 250 mg white,

elliptical, biconvex, film-coated tablets, engraved with

“J250". Each bottle contains 100 or 500 tablets.

500 mg tablet

AG-Ursodiol (ursodiol) is available as 500 mg white,

elliptical, biconvex, scored, film-coated tablets,

engraved

with “J500"

on one side and breakline on other side.

Each bottle contains 100

tablets.

Before you take AG-Ursodiol, tell your

doctor if:

You have taken AG-Ursodiol before

and it

was not well-tolerated or caused an

allergy.

You have liver problems, or are in need of a

liver

transplant.

You have a partial blockage of bile flow

due to

disease outside of the liver.

You have variceal bleeding (bleeding from

swollen veins, arteries, or lymph vessels)

You have ascites (swelling in the

abdomen).

You are taking other prescription or non-

prescription medicines.

You are using any new medicine

(prescription or

non-prescription) such as

bile reduction

medicines (cholestyramine

or colestipol),

aluminum based antacids

(Rolaids, Maalox,

Mylanta, and many

others), and cyclosporine,

nitrendipine, or

dapsone.

You develop any new medical problem

while

using this medicine.

You have severe stomach pain

You are pregnant, plan to become pregnant,

breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed.

You need other medical treatment by

another

doctor, let him or her know that

you are taking

AG-Ursodiol

AG-Ursodiol is not recommended for use in

children.

You should discuss with your doctor the benefits and

risks of taking AG-Ursodiol for your medical

condition.

This medication is prescribed for a particular health

problem and for your personal use only. Do not give it

to another person.

Keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of

children.

ABOUT THIS MEDICATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 28 of 29

IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ

The following medicines may decrease the amount of

ursodiol that is absorbed into your body:

Medicines that reduce the amount of bile acids

such

as cholestyramine or colestipol

Antacids that contain aluminum such as Rolaids,

Maalox, Mylanta, and many others.

The absorption and metabolism of the following

medicines may be affected by taking ursodiol:

Cyclosporine

Dapsone

Nitrendipine

Use of these medicines with AG-Ursodiol may

require patients to be closely monitored and the dose

their medicines adjusted.

Usual Adult Dose:

Your doctor would have prescribed the amount of

AG-

Ursodiol you should take each day for

your medical

condition. AG-Ursodiol

should

be taken in 2 to 4

divided doses with food. It is easier to

remember to

take your medication if it is taken at the

same time each

day. Setting up a routine to take your

medication helps

this activity become a normal part of

your day.

Take AG-Ursodiol for the full duration of treatment,

even if you begin to feel better.

To break AG-Ursodiol, 500mg scored tablet easily,

place the

tablet on a flat surface with the scored section

on top.

Hold the tablet with your thumbs placed close

to the

scored part of the tablet (groove). Then apply

gentle

pressure and snap the tablet segments apart

(segments

breaking incorrectly should not be used).

segments should be swallowed unchewed, with

water.

To prevent leakage of the active medicinal ingredient

(ursodiol) from the cut tablets onto the surface of

whole

tablets and spreading the bitter taste, it is

recommended

that cut tablets be stored separately

from whole tablets.

This medication should only be used as instructed by

your doctor. Follow your doctor’s instructions. Do

change the dose or stop the treatment without

your

doctor’s advice.

Your doctor will ask you to have

regular

medical

checkups, and

will likely require

liver

tests.

It is

important to respect the dates proposed.

Overdose:

The most severe symptom of overdosage would

likely

be diarrhea.

Missed Dose:

If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as

remember. If it is almost time for your next

dose, skip the

dose you missed and take your next

regularly scheduled

dose. Do not take a double dose.

SERIOUS SIDE EFFECTS, HOW OFTEN THEY

HAPPEN AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT THEM

Symptom / effect

Talk with

your doctor or

pharmacist

Stop

taking

drug

and call

your

doctor

or

pharma

cist

Only

if

severe

In all

cases

Common

>1% and

<10%

Anemia

Dizziness

Reduced white

blood cells in

the blood

Headache

Diarrhea

Swelling of the

extremities

Blood glucose

increased

Abdominal pain

Unknown

Swelling

beneath the

skin and

Swelling of the

throat

Palpitation

Cough

Increase in

eosinophils in

the blood

Drug

hypersensitivity

to include facial

edema

Decreased

blood

neutrophils

PROPER USE OF THIS MEDICATION

If you think you have taken too much AG-Ursodiol,

contact your healthcare professional, hospital

emergency department, or regional poison control

center immediately, even if there are no symptoms.

INTERACTIONS WITH THIS MEDICATION

SIDE EFFECTS AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT THEM

AG-Ursodiol Product Monograph

Page 29 of 29

IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ

Interstitial lung

disease

Decreased

blood platelets

Severe

inflammation

and peeling of

the skin

Constipation

Skin redness

and Papular

skin lesion

Fever

Photosensitivity

reaction

Aggravation or

occurrence of

Jaundice

This is not a complete list of side effects. For any

unexpected effects while taking AG-Ursodiol contact

your doctor or pharmacist.

AG-Ursodiol tablets should be stored at

room

temperature at 15°C to 30°C in a closed

container.

Keep this and all other medication out of the reach and

sight of children.

If you want more information about

AG-Ursodiol

Talk to your healthcare professional.

Find the full product monograph that is

prepared for

healthcare professionals and

includes this Patient

Medication Information by

visiting the Health Canada

website(https://www.canada.ca/en/health-

canada/services/drugs-health-products/drug-

products/drug-product-database.html); or by

calling the sponsor at: 450-449-9272

This leaflet was prepared by:

Angita Pharma Inc.

1310 rue Nobel

Boucherville, Québec

J4B 5H3

Last revised: September 21, 2020

HOW TO STORE IT

MORE INFORMATION

REPORTING SIDE EFFECTS

You can report any suspected side effects associated with

the use of health products to Health Canada by:

Visiting the Web page on Adverse Reaction

Reporting

(https://www.canada.ca/en/health-

canada/services/drugs-health-

products/medeffect-canada/adverse-reaction-

reporting.html

) for information on how to report

online, by mail or by fax; or

Calling toll-free at 1-866-234-2345.

NOTE: Contact your health professional if you need

information about how to manage your side effects. The

Canada Vigilance Program does not provide medical advice

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